Tag Archives: David

Se7en Title Sequence

Directed in 1995, David Fincher’s Se7en is a film that defies easy categorization. Perhaps too dark to qualify as a golden classic despite having all the right ingredients, neither is it a cult film in the traditional sense, as it is stocked with A-list talent and propped up by a smart script, a memorable score and rich cinematography, and a production value in lockstep with Fincher’s vision for the film.

But few would question its merits as a cop drama, which as a genre trails right behind Westerns as films that Americans love to love but rarely support at the box office. Se7en beat those odds and enjoyed wide critical and popular success thanks in large part to a strong word of mouth around the film’s many hairpin turns, and one other thing: its title sequence.

It’s a sequence that has drawn comparisons to the grotesque photography of Joel-Peter Whitkin and the experimental self-aware filmmaking of Stan Brakhage, and its format has been likened to Stephen Frankfurt’s title design for Robert Mulligan’s 1963 adaptation of the courtroom thriller To Kill a Mockingbird, which also features close-up photography of personal items to describe the psyche of one of the film’s key players. But it is more likely a convergence of unique circumstances and artistic vision that gave the Se7en titles their own distinct cadence, blending Fincher’s treatment of the film itself with Kyle Cooper’s visual interpretation of its narrative.

Find out more here.

B.B. King on The Blues

“I don’t like to feel that I owe anything. I like to feel that I pay my own way, no free lunch.”
– B.B. King on September 5, 1986, as told to Joe Smith

Mr. B.B. King. The blues legend says he played 300 nights a year for four-plus decades. That’s just ridiculous. We’re talking about nearly 15,000 shows. King turns 90 this year and you still just might be able to see him on stage. So what’s his secret?

In this animated film created from B.B. King’s interview with legendary music executive, Joe Smith, the musician explains how he approaches an audience, how a fire at a juke joint led to his naming his guitar “Lucille”, why the blues isn’t just being down on your luck, and why compliments don’t mean it’s time to stop practicing or perfecting your craft.

PIXIES – GREENS AND BLUES

I’m not together, and you know it’s true.
My bits all wander in the trees.
And if I ever seem a little strange,
Would you excuse me please?

I said I’m human, but you know I lie.
I’m only visiting this shore.
I’ll soon be leaving in the outbound tide
I pray again we will meet.

I’m wasting your time, just talking to you
Maybe best you go on home.
I’ll leave you alone, fade from your mind,
Slip into the greens and blues.

I said I’m human, but you know I lied.
I’m only visiting this shore.
I’ll soon be leaving in the outbound tide.
I pray again we will meet.

I’m wasting your time, just talking to you
Maybe best you go on home.
I’ll leave you alone, fade from your mind
Slip into the greens and blues.

Greens and blues…

I’m wasting your time, just talking to you,
Maybe best you go on home.
I’ll leave you alone, fade from your mind,
Slip into the greens and blues.

I’m wasting your time, just talking to you,
Maybe best you go on home.
I’ll leave you alone, fade from your mind,
Slip into the greens and blues.

Twenty Eight Feet: life on a little wooden boat

A short documentary about David Welsford, who has given up the luxuries of land in search for happiness and adventure on a 50 year old wooden boat he restored from a scrap heap. Featuring music from Bahamas, Acres & Acres and Ben Howard!

Twenty Eight Feet: life on a little wooden boat from kevinAfraser on Vimeo.